Tag Archives: Small business

Three financial tips for small business entrepreneurs

Here are three things which small business owners should consider implementing to improve their chances for long-term success.

  1. Do Not aim to match or beat prices offered by competitors 

Price may win among big retailers that include, as well as countless other larger businesses in a variety of categories – but smaller businesses know all too well they typically can’t compete in this big-box space when it comes to money. Instead? This is where smaller businesses have the chance to thrive in offering other experiences that stand-out from prices alone. Of course, price will factor into the overall impression any business leaves on consumers, but when combined with other experiences price can often become overlooked thanks to the many other factors that can outshine it.

  1. Create a loyalty program that encourages repeat customers 

Big or small, businesses gain the opportunity for increased customer retention and more frequent spending when loyalty programs are offered. You can create one that is digital, mobile, or even old-fashioned by using paper and a hole puncher, but the idea is that you create one that makes sense for your business and your customers.

Another tip to help your loyalty program thrive? Give it extra TLC so that it stands out among your other marketing efforts, including your business newsletters, via social media and of course, whenever you’re tending to customers and during any customer communication. Aim to have it stand out as a well-respected perk to customers experiencing your business.

  1. Have a lean start-up

Big companies like Starbucks test new concepts on smaller markets before launching their products worldwide. Small companies can learn from this approach. Develop a prototype to get the product out, launch it in smaller markets, test it, get feedback, pivot, and then refine it. By using this cost-effective process, you’ll have a refined product or service designed to the taste and needs of potential clients because they told you what they liked and wanted along the way.

As the economy continues to improve, small businesses will have more opportunities to expand and grow. By taking advantage of opportunities that exist now, you’ll improve your chances of success. 

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

References:

Glassman, Barry. “The Best Financial Advice For Small Business Owners Now”. Forbes.com. N.p., 2014. Web. 29 June 2017.

Leinbach-Reyhle, Nicole. “3 Small Business Tips Uniquely Aimed At Entrepreneurs”. Forbes.com. N.p., 2016. Web. 29 June 2017.

When it comes to strategy, think big

To create a strategic roadmap for your business you don’t need heaps of wonderful resources; you only need to give up your preconceived ideas about strategy. Sometimes the thing that holds a small business back the most is small thinking. If you believe that the size of your business is a disadvantage when it comes to strategic planning, simply because the big companies have all the financial resources and manpower to influence the market, then why start a business at all? Fortunately, money or size of personnel is not what counts when you create a strategic plan – common sense is.

Keep your enthusiasm in check

You don’t need to strategise constantly; rather make sure that you understand the market conditions and that you have attainable goals – don’t waste time on too much planning. You could also try using your company’s small size to out-manoeuvre larger, slower companies by addressing challenges and options and seizing opportunities over short but regular spaces of time.

Challenge assumptions

Believing in the status quo is not part of a successful entrepreneur’s strategy. The business climate is constantly changing with the help of the Internet, social media and other mobile devices. Many companies have landed on the business rubbish dump because they could not adapt to changing times. Question everything. Attempt playing devil’s advocate with your new ideas, then get your team together and devise plans to make the idea viable. Ignore preconceived notions about what can or cannot work – while some business principles are a given, very few business ideas are completely useless.

Avoid myopia

You can build a sales strategy based on the outcome you desire. Don’t miss out on good opportunities because you are too caught up in day-to-day activities to think outside the box and re-examine your progress. Change your perspective and get your team to think in more creative, profitable ways.

Jack (or Jane) be nimble, eager and bold

The market and the needs of customers keep changing, and it’s beyond your control. What you can control, however, is how you adjust to these changes and what new plans you create. Be bold in your new approach and keep an open mind as to the unconventional ways in which to grow.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

Financial risk management for your small business: Do you know how to do it?

A9Is it really necessary to be able to manage financial risk? The answer is a definite “Yes!” It can make the difference between having a successful business or being forced to close down the business. Make sure you give your business the best chance to survive and thrive by understanding and implementing financial risk management.

Financial risk management can be broken down into the following steps:

1. Understand what financial risk is

A financial risk is any event or circumstance that can have a potentially negative impact on the finances of a business.

2. Identify financial risks applicable to the business

Identify all the financial risks that you can think of which can have an impact on the business. Consider using brainstorming with employees and/or a SWOT analysis to help you identify as many potential risks as possible.

An example of a financial risk is that customers who buy on credit from your business will not be able to pay their outstanding accounts.

3. Assess each financial risk separately

Estimate as well as you can with the available information how probable it is that each risk can affect the business and what the possible amounts of the damage (negative impact) could be if the risk should realise.

Taking the example of customers who will not be able to pay their outstanding accounts, the following matrix is handy to assess the probability and extent of the damage should the risk realise. Assume that the probability and potential damage of clients not being able to pay their outstanding accounts are high as indicated on the matrix with “X”.

Probability of damage occurring (clients not able to pay accounts)
High Medium Low
Estimated extent of damage Major damage e.g. R100 000 X
Medium damage e.g. R30 000
Minor damage e.g. R5 000

4. Treat risks to limit negative impact on business

Select and treat those risks you have the most control over to focus your financial risk management efforts on. Control in this context will be the ability to minimise the chances and potential damage caused if the risk should realise.

Create and implement an action plan to reduce each of the selected risks to acceptable levels.

Consider using insurance to protect the business against external risks which the business does not have much control over e.g. natural disasters.

To continue with the example: the matrix shows that it is highly probable that clients won’t be able to pay their accounts, and the amount of the resulting bad debts can be major. There are measures that the business can implement to prevent, or at least decrease, the likelihood and the amount of damage due to bad debts. These are the measures that the business should focus on implementing to reduce the risk of bad debts occurring to acceptable levels. Preventive measures could include checking the credit record of customers before selling on credit to them and implementing a pre-approved credit limit per customer.

5. Monitor the financial risk management plan

Review the financial risk management plan regularly to ensure that it stays up to date with the changing circumstances of the business and remains effective to decrease current financial risks.

Using the above example of potential bad debts, the regular inspection of the debtors’ age analysis might show an increase in long outstanding amounts which can indicate that the credit policy for clients needs to be reviewed and updated.

Proper financial risk management can greatly increase a business’ chances of being successful and profitable. If you would like to implement a financial risk management plan or suspect that the financial risk management plan currently in use might be outdated, do contact your accountant for professional assistance.

Reference list:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.